Grand Rapids first - and only! - breakfast cereal café is going to featured on the Food Network!

I have SO been meaning to check out Eastown Cereal Café; the creative shakes in particular look amazing!

The waffle creations looks so good too! And who doesn't love breakfast cereal in general? It takes you right back to being a kid with a big bowl of Fruity Pebbles in front of you, watching Saturday morning cartoons!

Plus, I am so impressed to that this awesome place is run by a recent high school graduate!

Taylor Kyle was just 17 when she put her plan in motion! She opened Eastown Cereal Café at 1507 Wealthy St. SE in February 2021. Taylor tells Wood TV 8 that her parents, who are also business owners, helped her turn her idea into reality.  Her brother Edward Christian now works at the café, helping to prepare orders, and her parents, Tony and Karmen, provide guidance.

Karmen tells Wood TV 8,

It’s a blessing, it really is. We are extremely grateful for the opportunity Taylor has to not only showcase her talent and her eagerness to be an entrepreneur, but also be able to be a blessing to up and coming youth who may have aspirations to be entrepreneurs.

Taylor, now 18, recently shared the news about the Food Network coming to film on Facebook.

We don't know the name of the new show yet, but the episode will be about everything cereal. The café is usually closed on Tuesdays (their regular hours are Sunday through Wednesday 8a.m. to 6p.m.), but they're inviting everyone to come and show their support Tuesday, August 10, when the Food Network will be shooting. Filming time is to be determined, but Eastown Cereal Café will be open 9am-6pm that day.

Follow Eastown Cereal Cafe on Facebook and Instagram for updates!

LOOK: 40 Discontinued & Special Edition Kellogg's Cereals

See How School Cafeteria Meals Have Changed Over the Past 100 Years

Using government and news reports, Stacker has traced the history of cafeteria meals from their inception to the present day, with data from news and government reports. Read on to see how various legal acts, food trends, and budget cuts have changed what kids are getting on their trays.