If the can area at your house is getting a little crowded, you're not alone. But there are some charities looking to help clear out your pantry.

When the Stay-At-Home mandate shut down can deposit returns at major supermarkets, it created a back log of cash holdings for citizens, which, according to some estimates, are holding over $50 million worth of ten cent cans and bottles.

That hold on returns is creating a worrying back log for the recyclers who will have to deal with it when the ban is removed.

Spencer Nevins with the Michigan Beer and Wine Wholesaler Association told WDIV in Detroit that recyclers are anticipating handling over 300 times their normal rate of bottle and cans once the ban is lifted, which he hopes will be soon.

And the condition of those bottles and cans worries grocery store owners.

“There's going to be ants. There's going to be roaches. I'm going to have an extra employee here. I'd rather have the state make stations and keep our store clean,” owner of Chene-Trombley Market, Sam Kassav told WDIV.  

As for any fear the coronavirus would be living in the returnables. Not a chance. It would have died long ago.

"As far as coronavirus goes, it's a lot more dangerous for a store employee to stock shelves than to deal with RVM machines," Marc Schupan, who runs a recycling plant told the Detroit Free Press.

If you need to free up room in your house, there are several charities willing to take the cans and bottles off your hands in return for the deposit.

Among those is the Area 11 Special Olympics, who have a drop off site open this coming Saturday at two locations:

  • Kentwood at 5738 Pineknoll Ct.
  • Caledonia at 9390 Whitneyville Ave SE

You can also call their office at 616.446.8851 (M-TR) if pick up is needed.

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