One of the benefits of having a door bell camera is you never know who will show up to dance on your front porch.

Matthew Saganski, who lives in the Rogue River Woods sub-division near Rockford, checked his video feed to find that these beautiful owls were dancing on his porch in the wee morning hours.

Saganski posted the video on his NextDoor feed.

Owls are beautiful animals. The look to me like cats that fly.

Owls bobbing their heads and moving back and forth in a kind of a dance is a common trait among the species.

According to the Audubon Society, owls move and bob their heads to get their hunting skills revved up to speed. On the society's web site, it explains that owls can actually "triangulate" their eye sight to hone in on dinner:

All these varied head movements help the owl judge the position and distance of things around it—essentially, to triangulate on objects, including potential prey, and to build a composite picture of its surroundings. This head-bobbing helps make up for an anatomical limitation: An owl’s eyes are fixed in position, so they simply can’t move the way our eyes do. To look up, down, or to the side, an owl has to move its head. They have very flexible necks and can do 270 degrees of a full head turn, looking over one shoulder, around the back, and almost over the opposite shoulder. And after a few of these head-bobs to triangulate on their prey, they rarely miss.

So the bad news is, there is a probably a boat load of mice hanging out in Matt's yard. The good news? Those three owls are about to eat some of them.

Enjoy some more dancing owls.

 

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